Hot Medical Diagnosis & Procedures Posts

How To: Perform a breast self exam

1 in 9 women will get breast cancer at some point in their lives, and at least a third of women will not self-check their breasts. Early diagnosis is essential in treating breast cancer, and that’s where monthly self-checks come in. If you’re not sure where to start – don’t worry! Dr Dawn Harper’s guide will give you advice on exactly how to self-check your boobs. Watch this video tutorial and learn how to self examine breasts for any lumps or possible cancer.

How To: Insert and remove staples

An important part of surgery is knowing the various types of closures to perform. This medical how-to video is a demonstration of a staple insertion and removal technique. The use of staples is used for laceration repair or wound closure in the operating room. Follow along and learn how to insert and remove stables. This is a two person procedure.

How To: Discontinue an IV line in nursing

Studying to be a nurse? Then a very common procedure in nursing involves removing a saline lock or an IV line. This procedure is also called DC IV, or discontinue an IV. Follow along in this nursing how-to video to learn the proper protocol for discontinuing an IV line. Before DCing the IV always double check the doctor's orders and have your materials handy.

How To: Take an arterial blood gas sample

This medical how to video demonstrates how to take an arterial blood gas sample. The purpose or arterial gas sampling is to assess the patient's respiratory status as well as the acid/base balance in their blood. To perform this medical procedure you will need the following instruments: protective eye wear, gloves, alcohol, iodine, arterial blood gas sampling kit, gauze and a bag of ice. Please not that this video is intended for medical professionals only.

How To: Use the BD Genie Safety Lancet blood sampler device

Check out this video tutorial to see how to use the BD Genie Safety Lancet blood sampler device. BD Genie Lancets are high quality, safety-engineered, single-use capillary blood sampling devices. They offer a permanently retractable blade or needle feature that minimizes the possibility of injury or reuse. BD offers a full range of blade depth and needle gauges for sufficient blood volume in multiple sample requirements. All Genie's can be used in conjunction with BD Microtainer Tubes.

How To: Perform an upper extremity exam on a patient

This video will show doctors the process of examining the upper extremity of the body. When you exam the extremities or any joints, it's good to have a systematic approach to how you will examine each joint. Learn about the inspection of each joint, range of motion, palpation and strength testing from Eve Bargmann, M.D. When examining the upper extremity, you should start with the shoulder and work you way down to the elbow, then the wrist, and lastly, the hand.

How To: Draw blood with the butterfly method

If you are having a difficult time drawing a patients blood, you might want to considering doing the butterfly procedure. Watch this instructional medical how-to video to learn the proper way of drawing in blood with this method. The butterfly procedure involves drawing blood from the back of the hand. Start by placing a band around the wrist, palpating the back of the hand and identifying the direction of the veins.

How To: Perform a brief neurological exam on a patient

A brief neurologic examination includes six sections: 1) mental status exam, 2) testing cranial nerves, 3) sensation exam, 4) testing strength, 5) deep tendon reflexes exam, and 6) coordination exam. Eve Bargmann, M.D., shows doctors how to perform this neurological examination on a patient. You will need to do a full neuralgic exam (not in video) if any abnormalities are found. But this is just a brief screening exam during a general physical exam.

How To: Six Things You're Definitely Doing Wrong in the Restroom—As Proven by Science

Let's take a minute and talk about something you're doing wrong — using the restroom. Many view the subject as improper or even taboo, but why? Thanks to your upbringing, you've assumed you know the basics... But you don't. Avoiding discussion on the subject has led many of us to unwittingly interact incorrectly during our private time with our old friend, Jon.

How To: Perform a lower extremity exam on a patient

In this medical video, learn the process of examining the lower extremity of the body. See demonstrations of how you inspect the lower extremity, how you palpate and then perform passive range of motion of the hip, knee and ankle. John D. Gazewood, MD, MSPH, will also teach doctors special maneuvers to help examine a knee injury. With any type of musculoskeletal exam, you're looking for things like deformity, swelling, and changes in coloration.

How To: Tie a two handed surgical square knot

Are you in medical school an planning to be a surgeon? Then here is a how-to video with various different surgical knot tips. The UT Huston Student Surgical Association (SSA) has put together this surgical knot tying online tutorial. Watch as Dr. John R. Potts, MD. demonstrates the two handed square knot. Practice the two handed square knot surgical suture before going into your surgical rotation.

How To: Inspect the female breast for cancer

This medical how-to video from the Department of Health Services Cancer Detection Section will help become more confident in inspecting the female breasts. An regular breast check is vital for cancer detection. Help you patients stay healthy by learning the essential of a clinical breast examination. This entails a comprehensive review of a patients symptoms, history and risk factors. Follow along to learn the basics of inspecting the female breast for cancer.

How To: Perform a full chest exam on a patient

When you're examining a patient's chest, you start out by simply looking at them— by inspection. It will be hard to count the respirations visually on a healthy person's chest because it moves so little, but in a patient with respiratory distress, the chest might be overactive and strain may show in the neck muscles. Eve Bargmann, M.D., will also teach doctors about palpation, percussion, and auscultation of the chest and back.

How To: Insert a peripheral IV catheter to administer fluids

IV's are used on patients to either administer fluids or medicines, and for a nurse, it's the number one task performed on the job in a hospital. Knowing the proper procedure for peripheral intravenous catheter insertion is a must. This interactive video module will help familiarize you with the medical procedure, but is not meant to be your sole method of instruction— always ask for supervision in performing a procedure if you've never done one before, or have little experience.

How To: Be prepared for the potential complications of heart surgery

If you or someone you love is undergoing heart surgery in the near future, it's important that you have a solid grasp of the potential complications such that you can do everything in your power to avoid them. In this brief medical-minded tutorial from ICYou, you'll learn about a few of the most common complications including bleeding, infection, damage to blood vessels, heart damage, heart attacks or strokes.

How To: Do a urinary catheterization procedure on a male

One of the hardest things a man can go through in life is a trip to the hospital, especially when he knows he's going to need a catheter. It's every man's worst fear. But for a nurse, it's necessary knowledge. Learning the male urinary catheterization procedure hands-on is difficult due to the urgency involved in patient care, so this video aims to prepare nurses so they can learn and stay fluent with the proper urinary catheterization technique of a male patient.

How To: Intubate a patient (endotracheal intubation procedure)

ER showed the world what goes on inside the emergency room, and in every episode, we experienced a common but very important procedure— intubation. But ER never made it seems easy; it showed just how hard it is for medical students to successfully intubate a patient due to fear and naivety. And for real-life doctors and medical practitioners, learning the art of airway management is just as difficult.