News: MIT Student Invents $3 Blood Sucking Plunger That Could Speed Up Healing for Millions

MIT Student Invents $3 Blood Sucking Plunger That Could Speed Up Healing for Millions

MIT Student Invents $3 Blood Sucking Plunger That Could Speed Up Healing for Millions

The medical field has known for some time now that negative pressure (re: suction) can drastically speed up wound recovery time. However, the machines that are currently available are quite expensive, and not an option for third world countries. Enter MIT student Danielle Zurovcik. The doctoral student has created a hand-powered suction-healing system that could completely revolutionize first aid in developing nations. Her device goes for only 3 bucks a pop.

Via Fast Company,

"The device is composed of an airtight wound dressing, connected by a plastic tube to a cylinder with accordion-like folds. Squeezing it creates the suction, which lasts as long as there's no air leak. What's more, where regular dressings need to be replaced up to three times a day--a painful ordeal--the new cuff can be left on for several days.

MIT Student Invents $3 Blood Sucking Plunger That Could Speed Up Healing for MillionsZurovcik originally intended to field-test the device in Rwanda, but then the Haiti Earthquake struck. At the request of Partners in Health, an NGO, she traveled to Haiti with 50 of the pumps.

Currently, Zurovcik is verifying the healing benefits of the device, and developing a new model that can be readily carried and concealed. The one technical hurdle that remains is ensuring the bandage seals tightly--but after that, the device could benefit a huge portion of the 50-60 million people in the developing world that suffer from acute or chronic wounds."

1 Comment

I didnt realize that it was expensive to get a wound sucked on.

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